What Were The 10 Amendments?

What are the 5 rights in the 1st Amendment?

The five freedoms it protects: speech, religion, press, assembly, and the right to petition the government..

Why was the 1st Amendment created?

The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects the freedom of speech, religion and the press. … The amendment was adopted in 1791 along with nine other amendments that make up the Bill of Rights – a written document protecting civil liberties under U.S. law.

When was the last amendment passed?

May 5, 1992By May 5, 1992, the requisite 38 states had ratified the amendment (North Carolina had re-ratified it in 1989), and it was certified by the archivist of the United States as the Twenty-seventh Amendment on May 18, 1992, more than 202 years after its original proposal.

What is our First Amendment?

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

What is the7th amendment?

Seventh Amendment Annotated. In Suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.

What is the seventh amendment protect?

This lack of jury trials may seem strange, as the Seventh Amendment guarantees the right to jury trial in certain civil cases. There are two main types of court systems in the United States: federal and state. The Seventh Amendment requires civil jury trials only in federal courts. This Amendment is unusual.

What are your rights as a US citizen?

First Amendment – protects the citizens’ freedom to practice the religion of their choice or not practice any religion, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, and freedom to peaceably assemble and address the government. … Seventh Amendment – guarantees citizens the right to a jury trial in federal civil cases.

Why is the 1st Amendment the most important?

Arguably, the First Amendment is also the most important to the maintenance of a democratic government. … The freedoms of speech, press, assembly and the right to petition the government and seek redress of grievances proclaim that citizens have the right to call the government to account.

What is the first second and third amendment?

It protects freedom of speech, the press, assembly, and the right to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. The Second Amendment gives citizens the right to bear arms. The Third Amendment prohibits the government from quartering troops in private homes, a major grievance during the American Revolution.

What were the first 10 amendments?

The Bill of Rights is the first 10 Amendments to the Constitution. It spells out Americans’ rights in relation to their government. It guarantees civil rights and liberties to the individual—like freedom of speech, press, and religion.

What are the amendments in order?

Amendments to the Constitution of the United States of AmericaAmendment 1 – Religion and Expression2 … Amendment 2 – Bearing Arms. … Amendment 3 – Quartering Soldiers. … Amendment 4 – Search and Seizure. … Amendment 5 – Rights of Persons. … Amendment 6 – Rights of Accused in Criminal Prosecutions. … Amendment 7 – Civil Trials.More items…

What are my amendment rights?

The Bill of Rights First Amendment: Freedom of religion, freedom of speech and the press, the right to assemble, the right to petition government. Second Amendment: The right to form a militia and to keep and bear arms. Third Amendment: The right not to have soldiers in one’s home.

What are my civil rights as an American?

Examples of civil rights include the right to vote, the right to a fair trial, the right to government services, the right to a public education, and the right to use public facilities.

What are the 15 amendments?

The amendment reads, “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.” The 15th Amendment guaranteed African-American men the right to vote.

How many US amendments are there?

27 amendmentsThe US Constitution has 27 amendments that protect the rights of Americans.

Who wrote the first 10 amendments to the Constitution?

James MadisonThe first 10 amendments to the Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. James Madison wrote the amendments, which list specific prohibitions on governmental power, in response to calls from several states for greater constitutional protection for individual liberties.

What is purpose of amendment?

The purpose of amendments is to provide a law with the protection of the federal government. States are unable to pass any law that violates with an amendment. Amendments typically reflect the changing societal views of the people and are to protect the people from unfair state legislature.

What is the 8 amendment in simple terms?

The Eighth Amendment to the United States Constitution states: “Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.” This amendment prohibits the federal government from imposing unduly harsh penalties on criminal defendants, either as the price for obtaining …

Who opposed the 7th Amendment?

If the Congress believed such a law was necessary, it would create one. Anti-Federalists, those who were against or skeptical of the new Constitution, were alarmed by this idea. They wanted the right to trial by jury written in stone, so to speak, as a guaranteed right under the new Constitution.

What does the 1st Amendment not protect?

Categories of speech that are given lesser or no protection by the First Amendment (and therefore may be restricted) include obscenity, fraud, child pornography, speech integral to illegal conduct, speech that incites imminent lawless action, speech that violates intellectual property law, true threats, and commercial …

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